Home Improvement

Roofing 101 Introduction to Roof Materials

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Roofing is a necessity for every home. It provides protection from the elements, and it also protects the structural integrity of your house. Roofs are made out of different materials depending on what type you need, how often you use your roof, and other factors.

In this blog post we will discuss some basic information about roofing materials – such as shingle types and roof material cost – to help you determine which one is best for your needs.

Asphalt Shingles

Asphalt roofing shingles are the most common type of roof material in America. They have been a popular choice for homeowners for years because they’re affordable, durable, and convenient to install. Asphalt is also one of the easiest types of roofs to maintain, keeping it looking good year after year with only minimal effort on your part (think sweeping or power washing).

There are two main types of asphalt roofing: fiberglass and organic mat. Organic mats consist mainly recycled paper products that can last up to 40-45 years before needing replacement; whereas fiber clay materials use clay mixed with asbestos fibers which creates an even stronger product than traditional asphalt tile – lasting about 55-60+ years! The cost difference between these different options is about $11,000 on average.

Roofing 101 Introduction to Roof Materials

Clay and Concrete Tiles

Clay roofing tiles are made from natural clay and mortar, whereas concrete roof tiles use the same materials as found in standard sidewalks. The cost difference between these two types is about $18,000 on average.

Clay roofs have a nicer look with more character than other options; however, they require annual replacement of individual pieces because it’s not possible to “patch” damaged areas like one would patch up an asphalt roof after hail damage. Concrete tile has virtually no maintenance requirements because its impervious to weather elements and will typically last many decades before needing replacement – saving you time and money over the long-term!

Metal Roofing

Metal roofing comes in a variety of types, but the most common are steel and aluminum. Steel is more durable than aluminum because it’s heavier-duty but also quite expensive for a material that will be exposed to harsh weather conditions.

Aluminum has been shown to last longer than its metal counterparts because it doesn’t corrode; however, this can depend on where you live as some climates may cause corrosion even with an aluminum roof. In general, though, both metals have a limited lifespan before they need replacement – again costing you time and money!

Slate

Slate is a natural stone that has been used for roofing since the Middle Ages. It’s one of the most durable roof materials, but it can be quite expensive to install and repair – so it may not be worth your money if you’re looking at paying out large sums of cash every few years to maintain its appearance.

Slate also requires special installation techniques because extreme temperatures (e.g., freezing) will cause cracks and fractures in this material over time due to shifting weight as well as expansion or contraction from temperature changes.

Wood Shingles and Shake

Wood Shingles and Shake are composed of a wood-based core with an asphalt surface that’s typically about one inch thick, and they’re used primarily for their aesthetic appearance.

These roofing materials are generally less expensive than slate or metal roofing because the installation process is not as intensive – but you’ll need to replace these more often (e.g., every 15 years), so it may end up costing you more in the long run if your home needs frequent repairs from this material.

The biggest drawbacks of Wood Shingles and Shake include susceptibility to fire damage due to its natural composition, vulnerability against termites and mold growth, along with being prone to rotting when moisture gets into them; thus, requiring costly repair jobs after heavy rainfall events like hurricanes/tropical storms.

Metal roofing is more expensive than Wood Shingles, but the long-term savings are worth it. Metal roofs require minimal maintenance and can last up to 50 years in some cases. They’re also fireproof because they don’t burn until a temperature of about 800° Fahrenheit; which should keep your family safe if there’s ever a house fire in your neighborhood.

The installation process for metal roofing is costlier than other materials like wood shingle or shake – again, you’ll need to see how these factors affect the total price when considering what kind of roof material will be best suited for the life style needs of your home and budget.

Synthetic Roofing Products

Synthetic Roofing Products are made from a combination of PVC, Acrylic and Polyester. They’re much more affordable than other roofing materials like Metal Roofs or Tile Roofs and can be installed more quickly.

The lifespan for these roofing materials is generally around 30-40 years; which is less than Metal or Tile Roofs, but still a substantial amount of time to cover the cost of installing them!

The installation process for synthetic roofing products also differs from other types of material because you’ll need to attach metal strips on the edge between each row in order to make it waterproof – this isn’t necessary with some other materials like tile roofs where water simply slides off.

Synthetic shakes are made by weaving together polyester fibers into a shingle shape and coating them with acrylic paint that looks just like natural wood. This will protect your home against fire and moisture damage while providing an affordable alternative to roofing materials that are more expensive.

Synthetic Roofs also come with a 50-year warranty against leaking, which is far longer than the typical 20- or 30-year warranties on other types of roofing.

The cost to install synthetic roofing can vary significantly depending on where you live and how many squares your home has. The average price for this type of material is around $53 per square if you do it yourself, but expect higher prices from professional contractors outside urban areas who will have to order their product in since they don’t stock it locally!

Shingles

Shingles are typically made out of asphalt, clay or slate. They all come in a variety different colors and textures to match your home’s design. Choosing the right roofing material can depend on multiple factors including cost, availability, durability and personal preference – so make sure you take into consideration what will work best for your situation before making any decisions about which one is the best for you!

The most common type of shingle is called fiberglass reinforced plastic (FRP). It was originally developed as an alternative to asphalt because it doesn’t require grinding up tar sands like traditional materials do. This means that FRP roofs have lower environmental impacts than other types of shingles do when they’re manufactured or disposed of.

EPDM Rubber Membranes

EPDM rubber membranes have become increasingly popular as an alternative option in recent years thanks largely in part to the fact that they’re very easy to install, offer damage resistance and are also energy efficient.

Fiberglass Roofing

Fiberglass roofing is often a better option for people with lower budgets because it’s one of the least expensive options on the market – but this doesn’t mean you should skimp out when it comes time to maintain your roof either!

It doesn’t require grinding up tar sands like traditional materials do. This means that FRP roofs have lower environmental impacts than other types of shingles do when they’re manufactured or disposed of.

Rubber is also easy to install, offers damage resistance and can be energy efficient if installed properly. Fiberglass roofing is often a better option for people with lower budgets because it’s one of the least expensive options on the market – but this doesn’t mean you should skimp out when it comes time to maintain your roof either!

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